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Source Installation Managers / Package Managers

While trying to compile gnumeric for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, I came upon several programs that allow you to manage software installed from source, using several different methods.

Software of this type seemed like such a wonderful idea, but somehow it was not at all easy to find out about when I didn't know exactly what the programs were called.

2013-08-09: I haven't looked at or used these lately. For CheckInstall (and other situations too), fpm is another solution that I've used recently. I also often make normal RPMs from spec files. See also Red Hat's "Software Collections".

Nix

http://www.linux.com/feature/155922

http://nixos.org/

Nix is a package manager that gets binaries when available and builds from source otherwise.

GNU Stow

GNU Stow is a program for managing the installation of software packages, keeping them separate (/usr/local/stow/emacs vs. /usr/local/stow/perl, for example) while making them appear to be installed in the same place (/usr/local)."

http://www.gnu.org/software/stow/

http://www.linux.com/feature/127393

CheckInstall

CheckInstall watches the source package's make install step and creates a Slackware, RPM, or Debian package for you.

http://asic-linux.com.mx/~izto/checkinstall/

http://www.linux.com/feature/114083

Excluding /selinux/context

From http://www.patrickmin.com/linux/tip.php?name=checkinstall.

Sometimes checkinstall includes /selinux/context. To exclude, run it like this:

checkinstall --exclude=/selinux,/selinux/context

Toast

Toast was what I ended up using for gnumeric, and it did almost exactly what I wanted it to do. I say almost, because I couldn't move it to another path—the programs were installed for the absolute path. Oh, it also didn't track / resolve dependencies, but none of these "source package managers" do that (update: nix does).

It does more of the work for you than the others. For standard autotools packages (configure, make, make install), you can type for instance toast arm sshfs-fuse, and it will download it, configure, compile, and install to its own directory (usually .toast), which can be in the user's home directory.

http://www.toastball.net/toast/

http://www.linux.com/feature/132425

CDE

http://www.pgbovine.net/cde.html

Packages an application and all its dependencies.

info/sourceinstallers.txt · Last modified: 2013-11-08 02:12 by adminsam